Why Election Processes Need Improvement

Societies need leaders that have the support of the people; they also need leaders with skills who are not beholden to financial interests or back-room promises. Current methods of electing and appointing leaders fail to do this. Elected officials tend to be more beholden to campaign donors than citizens, and tend to be better followers . . . → Read More: Why Election Processes Need Improvement

The Presumption of Reason

In this address, perhaps the last paper he wrote, Professor Hayek elaborates on the relationship between the evolution of the moral order and evolution of reason, arguing that the latter is dependent on the former, and that rationalists, like Marx and others, who try to construct a social order based on reason (just a small . . . → Read More: The Presumption of Reason

Fact and Value Revisited

The modernism which shaped the culture of the twentieth century can be traced to the philosophy of G.E. Moore, with its characteristic separation of fact and value. This already assumes a separation of subject and object, so loosing both the conditions of freedom and the mind’s way to reality.

As the rising star of philosophy . . . → Read More: Fact and Value Revisited

Private lives, public responsibility

Today’s New York Times (May 16, 2011) carries an important conversation entitled, Questions Raised About a Code of Silence about the French journalistic habit of protecting the private lives, especially the sexual lives of elected and other public figures.

These reflections come in the wake of the attempted rape (among other charges) leveled against IMF . . . → Read More: Private lives, public responsibility

On democracy and free elections

Democracy cannot exist only as a slogan. Is constituent elements, and the entirety of the process must be considered in demands for “democracy,” and in efforts to bring stable democratic conditions to obtain.

. . . → Read More: On democracy and free elections

Economic Theory must Learn to Value Land, Labor, and Money

Abstract: Externalities to the supply and demand curve—land, money, and labor—are not properly accounted for in contemporary economic theory. This lacuna leads to a failure to understand and critique the problems of economic rent that creates consolidated wealth without work at the expense of those who work and deserve the fruits of their labor. The . . . → Read More: Economic Theory must Learn to Value Land, Labor, and Money

Saudi King, Ahmadinejad Talk Politics on Phone 12/10/2010

Abstract: All relationships, including international relations swim in a fragile blend of “domestic” policy and “foreign” policy.

In the case of this conversation in question, Saudia and Iran are not quite “domestic” but from the perspective of US interests in the region, that conversation must be regarded as “talk . . . → Read More: Saudi King, Ahmadinejad Talk Politics on Phone 12/10/2010

Church attendance drops for the working class

The Enlightenment has created the basis for an explosion of knowledge, but when it comes to religion its bias toward privileging rationalist, materialist explanations too often leads to the kind of analysis that reconfirms the materialist biases of the analysis rather than comprehending the beliefs and practices of the religious adherents. . . . → Read More: Church attendance drops for the working class

Urbanization – Is it an advance over a rural lifestyle or a destructive trend?

Abstract: The issue of urbanization is one that needs to be addressed in these early stages of the new millennium. For a time, city life was considered more sophisticated and “country cousins” were looked down upon. Today the pendulum has swung back again. As the problems of urbanization—slums, crime, and so forth—have reared their ugly . . . → Read More: Urbanization – Is it an advance over a rural lifestyle or a destructive trend?